Smart homes? Connected cars? Explore the ‘M2M’ way

By , 11 July 2012 at 20:24
Smart homes? Connected cars? Explore the ‘M2M’ way
Digital Life

Smart homes? Connected cars? Explore the ‘M2M’ way

By , 11 July 2012 at 20:24

Think about this – there are estimated to be a staggering 1 billion ‘connected machines’ or machine to machine (M2M) solutions across the world. This spans connected vans, smart meters, home monitors, public security and CCTV, traffic lights, digital signs or even vending machines that can communicate when they are running out of stock.

Take a look at this interactive site and video for a glimpse of the M2M story in action.

The scope here is immense. M2M offers connectivity and solutions that enable devices to communicate over wireless or fixed telecom networks. All of this is geared towards making machines, alarms, sensors and other devices more efficient, better managed and properly maintained.

But this is really just the start. M2M has the potential to transform every part of society, helping boost the productivity of companies across sectors and helping to address major public policy challenges such as climate change or managing healthcare for ageing populations.

The number of M2M devices is expected to rise to 10 billion worldwide by 2020, creating the backbone of the digital economy from smart homes and connected cars to smart cities and connected healthcare.

And Telefónica is a part of these projects, continuing to contribute to a ‘digital society’.

Related News 10 July 2012: A total of seven world mobile operators – Telefónica (through the Telefónica Digital unit), KPN, NTT Docomo, Rogers, SingTel, Telstra and Vimpelcom have entered into an alliance to initiate collaboration with respect to their M2M businesses. Want the story now? Find it here.

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